Say Their Names

Thank you to everyone that has helped make these biographies available including:

LHAMAR Members and Lake Highlands High School National Honor Society

Aaron Campbell
Aaron Campbell

Aaron M. Campbell lived in Portland, Oregon. He was a father and a beloved son. Aaron had just recently lost his brother to heart and kidney disease and was suffering from depression and suicidal thoughts.

Abdirahman Salad
Abdirahman Salad

Abdirahman Salad was 15 years old at the time of his death. On a GoFundMe page to support the family his elder sister, Fatuma, said that Mr. Salad w as a "great brother and our oldest brother out of our 11 siblings." Neither of Mr. Salad's parents speak English and his dad is blind, so this contributed to the feeling that the family had of being voiceless and hopeless in seeking answers. A teacher described him as nice and respectful. A classmate described Mr. Salad, a Columbus, OH resident, as a good kid hanging around not so good people. Mr. Salad attended Horizon Science Academy and was reportedly assigned to the National Youth Advocate Program, an emergency shelter in the area, as he was having some troubles with the law.

Abdoulaye Thiam
Abdoulaye Thiam

The Thiam family moved from Mbour, Senegal (West Africa) in 2008 and lived in their Memphis home for seven years. Mr. Thiam was a Sheffield High School graduate who played soccer and spent a great deal of time with his father. His father says his son was a hard worker and always did what he was told. The family isn’t sure what led to the shooting. They say Thiam was outside at the time and his brother was inside the house when the police arrived. The family also stated Mr. Thiam had been given a mental health evaluation the prior year and was on medication as a result.

Abram Onkgopotse Tiro
Abram Onkgopotse Tiro

Mr. Tiro was born in Dinokana, a small village near Zeerust North West Province, South Africa. He had 2 brothers and 1 sister, and his family greatly influenced his leadership skills at a young age. He was a hard worker, and participated early in life in student government. Mr. Tiro was a South African student activist and militant, with a lifelong commitment to advancing rights. He was expelled from the University of Limpopo in 1972 for his political activities, as he became an active member of the South African Student Organisation, out of which the Black Consciousness Movement grew. Following his expulsion, in 1972, he produced a scathing critique of the Bantu Education Act of 1953, and went on to teach history at Morris Isaacson High School near and around Central Western Jabavu (CWJ) in Soweto in 1973. Tsietsi Mashinini, who was an integral part of the 1976 student uprising, was one of Tiro's students during the time he taught at Morris Isaacson, and many of his students have recalled his impact on their own politicization during this period of student organization in South African history.

Addie May Collins
Addie May Collins

Addie Mae Collins was born in Birmingham, Alabama, on April 18, 1949. She attended the 16th Street Baptist Church with her parents, Julius and Alice, as well as her six siblings. On the morning of Sunday, September 15, 1963, 14-year-old Collins was in the 16th Street Baptist Church basement room with a group of other children when a bomb went off.

Ahmaud Arbery
Ahmaud Arbery

Ahmaud Arbery was born and raised in Brunswick, GA. He graduated from Brunswick High School in 2012. He attended South Georgia Technical College to train for a career as an Electrician. He is survived by his mother, father, his brother and sister, many extended family members, and loving friends. Family and friends describe Ahmaud (nicknamed "Maud" by some) as humble, hardworking, and loyal. He loved sports, especially Football and Baseball, and always wore the number 21 on his jersey, which was passed down to him from his older brother. Friends said Ahmaud would give you the shirt off his back if you needed it, and had a smile that lit up the room.

Akai Gurley
Akai Gurley

Mr. Gurley was born in St. Thomas, the Virgin Islands, then moved to New York City. He lived in nearby Brownsville with his partner, Kimberly Ballinger, her daughter, and their two-year-old daughter, Akaila.

Alexia Christian
Alexia Christian

Alexia was an Atlanta native and mother of 2 young boys. Her mom, Felecia, and sister, Ramada, spoke out about her tragic death. Women on the Rise and other members of her community came together to remember Alexia and speak out for justice.

Alfred Olango
Alfred Olango

Mr. Olango arrived in the U.S. as a refugee from Uganda in 1991. He was born in Kampala, Uganda in 1978. Mr. Olango first came to New York with his mother and eight siblings as refugees in 1991. He married in 2001, having one child with his wife at the time. He worked at Toro manufacturing and McDonald's, and he hoped to one day open his own restaurant.

Alonzo Smith
Alonzo Smith

Alonzo Smith was a 27-year-old black man. He worked as an elementary school Special Education teacher. Smith lived in Southeast Washington and was the father of a 6-year-old boy. He also had two sisters, Shelita Smith and LaDon Thomas. Smith had a strong relationship with his mother, Beverly Smith, who also acted as his strongest advocate after his death and fought for justice to be served for her son.